Facon featured on Omeleto

‘Facon’ was featured on Omeleto on Thursday 15th May 2020. The project was released several years ago, but it’s great exposure for the project! Always nice for projects to get an extended run. Have a watch! At present it’s getting close to 40,000 views!

It also got a lovely, and very complimentary, little write up:

Facon

A woman must confess her love of meat to her vegan boyfriend before he meets her family.

Tia is in love with her boyfriend. There’s one problem, however: Travis is a devout vegan, and Tia is secretly a meat lover from a family of enthusiastic meat lovers.

But when Travis presses the issue of meeting her family, Tia finally invites him over for dinner. But doing so may potentially reveal her dark, secret truth, and derail an affectionate and promising relationship.

Director Joshua Dang and writer Felicity Pickering have crafted a nimble short comedy that is both a charming romance and a comedy of manners, especially in an era where lifestyle choices like diet are conflated with identity. It pokes fun at the growing chasms between different diet choices and the discourses that have sprung up around food, with both a warm understanding and indulgence for human foibles and vulnerability and an eye for gentle social satire.

The production begins a heightened sunlit quality and glossiness in the cinematography that takes its cues from breezy romantic comedies, featuring affluent characters living in urbane settings in adorably decorated apartments. But then it shifts into a more muted (though still polished) naturalistic look that shows Tia’s reality, which is still affluent and immersed in the lingua franca of social responsibility-cum-conspicuous consumption, complete with quinoa sushi and kombucha. There are other visual flights of fancy that take their cues from surreal horror, among other modes, but these bring Tia’s subjective emotions to life, gesturing at her anxieties, fears and fantasies.

The mix of visual approaches mirrors the different strands that structure the narrative. The arc is wrapped around Tia’s relatable fear of revealing her true, full self to her sweet, affectionate boyfriend, who may have a different set of values from her, and watching Tia navigate her dilemma is highly relatable and enjoyable to watch.

But tucked into that journey are sharp observations and clever moments of satire on the lifestyle and social identity we place around food. The storytelling clearly has a lot of fun skewering both sides of the meat/non-meat divide, though it never feels mean-spirited, thanks to smart and even-handed writing and performances. The actors, in particular, underplay the humor, even during the film’s reveries, and keep their pulses on the emotions between a couple navigating their first potential major obstacle — a roadblock that the film handles with an equally good-hearted but sharp lightness of touch and a bit of a wink as well.

In a blithe, breezy way, “Facon” acknowledges the complex role that food plays in human culture, history, community and self: it connects families, forms a point of mutual interest and experience during courtship and can an extension of values and identities. It is both a necessity that many go without, and a luxury elevated into art or totems of social identity. The film also has a keen intelligence in portraying how this complexity plays out, whether it’s in the trendiness of an eatery to a no-holds-barred reminder of the animal carcasses that our tidy little meats come from. These ideas intersect in a feather-light, witty way with how the stories of our lives play out, taking us in directions we don’t often expect or appetites we wouldn’t have imagined for ourselves.

http://omeleto.com/253152/

Facon gets special mention at Flickerfest and is included in Flickerfest National Tour!

Flickerfest

Two updates from the festival front! Facon got a special mention at the Flickerfest Green Flicks section. Joshua Dang, Barbara Ings and I were thrilled to hear it, since there were really really good films in the section. Greenflicks was judged by Costa Georgiadis, Gregory Miller and Kate Harris. The judges praised Facon for its sense of humour dealing with environmental issues.

We’re also really happy about how well the film played at all the screenings. The Short Laughs Comedy sessions were sold out and it was great to be alongside such hilarious company!

Facon at Flickerfest

Shaun Colnan, who starred as Travis, makes a short speech after Facon receives an honourable mention at the closing night awards ceremony. 

The other great news is that Facon has been chosen to tour nationally. The full tour dates can be seen here.

Flickerfest Closing Night 1

Me (Writer / Producer), Barbara Ings (Producer), Jane Watt (Tia), Costa Georgiadis (Greenflicks Judge), Shaun Colnan (Travis) and Kate Harris (Greenflicks Judge) at the Flickerfest Closing Night. Facon director Joshua Dang was sadly unable to attend.

Flickerfest Closing Night 2

Shaun Colnan (Travis), Barbara Ings (Producer), Me (Writer / Producer) and Jane Watt (Tia) at the Flickerfest Closing Night. Director Joshua Dang was sadly unable to attend.

Facon At Flickerfest!

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I’m thrilled to announce that the film I wrote and produced Facon is having it’s World Premiere at Flickerfest. It’s an amazing accomplishment for the director Joshua Dang, producer Barbara Ings and the whole team to have achieved. Come along to support the film and laugh enthusiastically at the jokes.

Flickerfest 2017 Festival Trailer from Flickerfest on Vimeo.

Facon is being featured in the Short Laughs Comedy screenings and GreenFlicks 2017, so there will be three screenings that you can attend:

Short Laughs Comedy – Fri 13 Jan, 8.45pm
http://flickerfest.com.au/programme/short-laughs-comedy-2017/
GreenFlicks 2017 – Sat 14 Jan, 4.30pm
http://flickerfest.com.au/programme/greenflicks-2017/
Short Laughs Comedy 2017 (repeat) – Sat 14 Jan, 6.30pm
http://flickerfest.com.au/programme/short-laughs-comedy-2017-repeat/

Tickets are $20 and it will be held at the Bondi Pavillion. Come along to watch some great comedy/environmental ideas and support the film!

http://flickerfest.com.au/film/facon/

National Young Writers’ Festival 2015

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This year I was lucky enough to be a festival artist at the National Young Writers’ Festival 2015. When I found out that I had been offered a spot as a festival artist I literally screamed and ran around my house, much to confusion of my housemates. National Young Writers’ Festival is a hoot! I had attended in 2014 and had absolutely fallen in love with the festival.

If you need any proof of how magical National Young Writers’ Festival was, you can just have a watch:

OH MY THE FEELINGS! It was a truly beautiful experience and I cannot recommend going to NYWF more. So many lovely exciting people just having a go. As one person said to me, what makes NYWF so special is that everyone is just trying their best. For many people it’s the first time they have chaired a panel or read to such a large audience. It’s a space where people are allowed to fail and experiment.

I attended a lot of things, but my favourite events were the Late Night Readings: Flirting with the Law, Screenwriting Workshop with Magda Wozniak, Late Night Readings: Breakups and Breakdowns and the Under The Sea Enchantment Ball (of course).

The Screenwriting Workshop was my favourite. I’ve always been curious about how writing rooms work and this session gave me a lot of insight. In the session we were treated as Home and Away writers and worked through the process of how to script a weeks worth of content. People were pitching ideas left right and centre and  bouncing ideas off each other. It made me realise that writing for tv is a lot about writing to constraint and working as a team.


I was on two panels:

The Plays The Thing –
Host: Kate McDowell. Participants: Felicity PickeringPhillip KavanaghLiv Satchel

Blurb:
When it comes to the writing community, playwrights and playwriting can often get swept under the rug. With playwriting one of the oldest forms of literature, it’s high time we put the spotlight back on the stage. These bards spill the beans on the playwriting industry, and the issues they face as playwrights today.

A Newcastle Story –
Participants: Felicity PickeringFinbah NeillThandi Chindove, Ewa Ramsey.

Blurb: In partnership with the Newcastle Museum, NYWF takes you on a trip into Newcastle’s history. From lightbulbs to biscuits, earthquakes to coal heaps, join these brilliant young storytellers as they delve into the museum’s collections and dig up some fascinating tales of Newcastle past, present and future.

The Plays The Thing was a great relaxed session. It was my first time being on a panel.

A Newcastle Story was more nerve wracking. A few weeks before the reading I had caught the train to Newcastle for the day to get a private tour of the Newcastle Museum. I had to find something in there that inspired me and write something in response.

Newcastle Museum had a series of portraits of hotels and pubs from Newcastle with stories about the pubs displayed on the side. I ended up writing a piece about an 18 year old girl who starts working at a hotel in Newcastle that is filled with backpackers and the hotel comes to represent that period of her life.

I have a few snaps from the A Newcastle Story reading:

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All in all NYWF was such a great experience and I hope to attend again next year!

 

Layover

Rhiona

On the 22nd and 23rd of October the short play I wrote and directed, ‘Layover’, was showcased as part of the Short Play and Film Night at UTS.

The play followed travellers Carol and Jarod who meet while on layover in Malaysia. I will leave the rest to the imagination, but I was very happy with the outcome. Amazing performances were made by Charlie Carpenter and Rhiona-Jade Armont. Huge thanks to Tom Crotty, Sophie Peppernell and Michael Karagiannakis for their hilarious guest appearances and thanks to the Backstage Theatre and Film Society for having short play nights.

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Luke Lloyd Alienoid @ ATYP

Luke Llyod Alienoid

Luke Llyod isn’t like other boys at school but luckily he knows exactly why he doesn’t fit in: he’s half alien. Being half alien comes with many benefits: he can talk to animals and can become invisible. But when the school ‘fathers vs students game’ comes up, the school bully insists on meeting Llyod’s father. However, contacting aliens is never easy.

Luke Llyod is a great twist on classic story of a boy who is struggling to fit in. While the story is definitely geared to younger audiences, it’s a production that anyone can take something away from. The acting is great, especially from such a young cast and stand out performances are made by the Bully and Luke Llyod. The production uses three projectors that are seamlessly integrated, for a production that feels entirely modern in both themes and technology. I recommend it.

Tickets
Full: $20
Earlybird tickets: $15

Times
Wed-Sat 7:00pm
Sun: 5:00pm
Matinee: Wed and Fri 11:30am

Bookings
atyp.com.au or 02 9270 2400

Venue
ATYP Studio 1 – The Whair
Pier 4/5 Hickson Road

March Opportunities

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There are lots of opportunities for emerging writers and theatre makers at the moment. Playwriting Australia has made a callout for Dramaturgy Interns. These interns will recieve ‘access to training and mentoring by industry professionals, and get to develop their practical skills in script assessment and explore the process of giving dramaturgical feedback.’

The internship is available to Sydney and Melbourne based playwrights, directors or dramaturgs. Applications close Monday the 24th of March, 5pm.

Additionally, there has been a call out for applications for the Monash Undergraduate Prize for Creative Writing. The award is open to emerging writers enrolled in either an undergraduate or honours degree. For the first year ever, the award is open to both students from Australia and New Zealand.

First prize is $4000. The highest placed student from Monash University will receive $1000. Both winners will be published in Verge, Monash University’s student publication. Entries have to be 1500–3000 words. Applications close Thursday the 17th of April.