Luke Lloyd Alienoid @ ATYP

Luke Llyod Alienoid

Luke Llyod isn’t like other boys at school but luckily he knows exactly why he doesn’t fit in: he’s half alien. Being half alien comes with many benefits: he can talk to animals and can become invisible. But when the school ‘fathers vs students game’ comes up, the school bully insists on meeting Llyod’s father. However, contacting aliens is never easy.

Luke Llyod is a great twist on classic story of a boy who is struggling to fit in. While the story is definitely geared to younger audiences, it’s a production that anyone can take something away from. The acting is great, especially from such a young cast and stand out performances are made by the Bully and Luke Llyod. The production uses three projectors that are seamlessly integrated, for a production that feels entirely modern in both themes and technology. I recommend it.

Tickets
Full: $20
Earlybird tickets: $15

Times
Wed-Sat 7:00pm
Sun: 5:00pm
Matinee: Wed and Fri 11:30am

Bookings
atyp.com.au or 02 9270 2400

Venue
ATYP Studio 1 – The Whair
Pier 4/5 Hickson Road

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BITE ME

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My monologue ‘Facon’ is being performed in an amazing show called ‘Bite Me’. There are only four more chances for you to see it! Make sure you get down to Australian Theatre for Young People before it’s gone forever!

Check out some of the great reviews for Bite Me:

…”this is a production that fascinates and impresses. It is thoroughly original.” Suzy Goes See

…”is a delightful picaresque performance centring on food.” Australian Stage

…”a flowing, varied and physically interesting showcase for the Australian Theatre for Young People’s fourth instalment of its Voices Project. It is the best to date.” Jason Blake, The Sydney Morning Herald

…”Bite Me brings quite a lot to the table.” Lloyd Bradford-Sykes, The Daily Review

It’s a great show that has a huge team of creatives behind it. Support Australian writing and young people in theatre!

To buy tickets just click here.

Work-Shop – Introduction to Street Art

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Street Art classes held at Work-Shop in Chippendale

Straight off the bat Work-Shop is a creative space that intrigues. Snuggled between the Abercrombie and the ultra modern Central Park, the Chippendale located workshop appears like a modern day curiosity shop, with eclectic mix of cacti, motorbikes and guitars on display.

Work-Shop's snappily designed logo.

Work-Shop’s snappily designed logo.

The brain child of Matt Branagan and Chester Garcia, Work-Shop hopes to engage the community in a range of new skills. The concept fills a niche demand, providing whimsical, fun and affordable lessons in life skills and alternative art.

Classes on offer refuse to be predictable, with a smorgasbord of ways to get ya’ quirk on. The workshops change throughout the year and have been determined organically with close collaboration with local artists. Past classes include flirting workshops, crotchet lessons and terrarium-making.

I attended the ‘Introduction to Street Art’ class. The availability of VB stubbies sets the night in a casual tone. We begin with an introductory talk with street artist, and our instructor for the night, Sidney Tapia. Sidney explains how often the illegal nature of street art leads many to under-develop their style, since at any minute they might have to bolt. Sidney is the owner and director of label Crown St, a skateboarder, a graffiti artist, and a damn fascinating man.

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The canvas.

Rough sketches and ideas are mapped out in the main space, then we head to the back garden. The noise and banter of the Abercrombie over flows into the space, giving the class an easy-going buzz. We find our metre of canvas and begin to spray. 

It’s a bit of a high to spray paint legally, like smoking weed in Amsterdam you feel like you’re going to get in trouble at any minute and just can’t quite come to terms with the normalcy. Sid talks to each participant personally and gives them notes on the finer touches of spray painting; how to get thin lines, how to add depth.

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Learning the finer techniques of street art.

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A participant getting a handle of the can.

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Sidney Tapia, our instructor for the night, giving some advice.

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Tomfoolery.

After swapping cans, discussing each others works, and a little tomfoolery, Sid brings the class together. He encourages all to find spaces to spray paint legally in Sydney and continue the craft.

‘Introduction to Street Art’ would be perfect present for the badass that’s always been afraid to get out the spray paint and go for it. The crowd was university student types and young professionals, but I think any demographic would find it a thrill. I would recommend it as a Christmas present for someone you can’t quite find something for, or for an off-beat date option. Gift certificates are available for those who like to give ‘experiences’, and at the price range offered (this class was $35), I think it’s a steal.

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Getting tips on where to spray paint legally.

For more information about the classes on offer at Work-Shop, check out their website, add them on facebook or follow them on twitter.

Word Travels Festival – Push – Rocks Walk – Stories

Madelaine Lucas performing.

Madelaine Lucas performing.

Push – Rocks Walk – Stories was held on the 12th and 13th of October as part of the Word Travels Festival. The tour, presented by Penguin Plays Rough, involved audience members being led throughout The Rocks to find writers hiding in nooks and crannies, ready with words.

A medley of literary delights were on offer with readings made by Patrick Lenton, Cait Harris, Phil Spencer and Madelaine Lucas. First to be discovered on my guided tour was actor Libby Ahearn who performed a whimsical parody of Sydney socialites, written by Cait Harris.

After a short walk through the markets, it was Phil Spencer who entertained us next with the tale of his first, last and only shift working in a bar in The Rocks.

After a walk through a windy tunnel we were given the privilege of seeing Madelaine Lucas perform. Accompanied by soft mesmeric guitar, Lucas spoke in a breathy voice of heartbreak and poetic memory, the wind only heightening the experience.

To round off the tour, Patrick Lenton told us a humorous tale of survival in Australia. The entire event was exciting and unique. The readings were filled with distinctly Australian voices, and exposed the public to the literary talent of a new generation of writers.

Word Travels Festival – NSW Australian Poetry Slam Final

Luka Lesson hosting with charm and charisma, and a surprisingly high level of talk about shoes.

Luka Lesson hosting with charm and charisma, and a surprising level of talk about shoes.

The NSW Final of The Australian Poetry Slam was held on Friday the 11th of October, as part of The Word Travels Festival. There were feature performances by Joel McKerrow and the highly sexual Ghostboy. Luka Lesson hosted the event with charm and charisma. Thomas Hill took home the NSW title with an evocative poem about abuse. Second place was a tie, resulting in a slam off between Newcastle based Jesse Brand and Bankstown based Zohab Khan. After a fierce battle it was Jesse Brand who progressed to the Australian Finals alongside Thomas Hill.

Art and About – ‘I Think I Can’ Review

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I Think I Can places a thoroughly modern concept: avatars, onto a nostalgic frame. The interactive artwork, being exhibited as part of the Art and About Sydney Festival, allows individuals to create avatars that live and interact in a large scale model railway named Springfield Junction.

Taking it’s name from popular children’s book The Little Engine That Could’, I Think I Can focuses on creation and storytelling. The work is the brainchild of Terrapin Puppet Theatre artistic director Sam Routledge and artist Martyn Coutts and is presented by Performance Space and Art and About Sydney.

I found I Think I Can at the Central Station Concourse on the opening night of Art and About Sydney, and quickly decided I wanted to experience it. After an informative chat with a volunteer I decided that I would get an avatar. The first step was a personality test. Then I was presented with a selection of different avatars that I could choose from. I chose an ‘Activist’. Other avatars that you could be assigned included the Queen, a vandal, a reality TV star, or President Obama.

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My ‘I Think I Can’ Passport and my selected avatar.

The next step was figuring out where he would be placed in Springfield Junction. I decided my little man should be hanging by the abattoir. Next his back story had to be established. I decided the activist was visiting friends who work at the abattoir and coming for a spot of protesting. The guy, let’s call him Ned, had decided to protest at the abattoir because he had found an embryo in a can from the factory. He’d only been an activist for about a week. This back story was recorded in an iPad.

My tiny avatar was then animated by a puppeteer and broadcast live onto a screen above the model town.

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The puppeteer animates the Activist.

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The Activist has become part of Springfield Junction.

I have been told that each time I come back I can change what my activist is up to and I can follow his adventures if he pops up in the ‘I Think I Can Times’: an online publication of the scandals and news of Springfield Junction.

I enjoyed the artwork on many levels. On one level, the process evoked nostalgia of model train stations and made me appreciate the enormous capacity we have as children to create fictional worlds. This element allows the work to be family friendly, it’s great for kids and it’s cheap (free to participate)!  On another level, I enjoyed the art work for all statements that it was making. I Think I Can made me consider how much we try escape our own lives through building hyperreal (often better) versions of ourselves, and our lives. I Think I Can felt like a tangible version of Second Life that was framed in a nostalgic way, making such virtual worlds that are traditionally seen as strange and deviant, playful and natural. It made me realise that this identification with a character is something that we are drawn to even as children.

What statements do you think I Think I Can is making?

Springfield Junction

Little avatars hard at work.

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Springfield Junction is a hot bed of activity.

Art and About Sydney – Opening Night

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The opening of Art and About Sydney was celebrated at Martin Place earlier tonight. The celebration, coined as Friday Night Live, was an evening of cocktails, music and film that set the tone for what is sure to be an inspiring and exciting festival. The event started with a screening of The Arrival by Shaun Tan with a live performance of the score by percussionist Ben Walsh and the 10-piece Orkestra of the Underground. Next The Break filled the audience with trippy space age rock from their new album, Space Farm. Delicious cocktails were on offer throughout the night alongside quirky food trucks. 

Cocktail

For the night owls the evening was just beginning. Attendees could head to the Justice and Police Museum for part one of Penguin Plays Rough at City of Shadows exhibition. This exhibition/performance/literary hybrid brings together ten writers, comedians, playwrights and other wordsmiths to create a story, over several months, in response to a photo chosen from the Police Forensic Archive.

For those looking for a chilled evening Custom’s House library offered the solution: relaxed music, readings and performance. Other recommendations for the night included seeing the Artists’ Market at the State Library of NSW or taking in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Exhibition at the Australian Museum.

Art and About Sydney boasts an eclectic and intriguing mix of artworks and performances that will bring the city to life from the 20th of September to the 20th of October. Have a look at the full spread of events and exhibitions here. In the next weeks I will be trying to see and review as much of the festival as possible! Happy festivaling!